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allocation. how do you generate returns and manage volatility in this kind of environment where there's so much you can't control? global head of institutional clients with jpmorgan asset management, welcome. i'm going to ask something that may be counter intuitive to a lot of people. maybe not to you. it seems to me your clients, institutions, pensions, endowments, are tax exempt. they don't have to worry quite as much it would seem to me about avoiding dividend taxes or capital gains taxes as ordinary individuals. am i right about that or wrong? >> yes and no. the point being if the fiscal cliff you look at china, eurozone, it is all coming together to create an environment of total uncertainty for a lot of the biggest investors in the world. pension funds in the u.s. are trying to manage the volatility of the funding levels, generating return. think of where the average u.s. pension fund is trying to again rate a return from 6.5% to 8%. >> it's not so much that they're concerned about a looming tax hike that might affect their portfolios as it is about the uncertainty that the cliff rep
, that's a target-rich environment is what we refer to california. they raise taxes again. they sent the message that the unions are going to continue to control the process out there. they defeated proposition 32. they passed proposition 30 which was the increase in their taxes. so, california businessmen and women are looking at their bottom line saying, where are we going to go? other places? >> governor, is it too much of a leap to say when we do this at the federal level they leave the country, bilss can eventually leave the country. >> sure. >> but we can't seem to make the leap to say that. and i'm talking about the fiscal cliff now. i wonder if you were at 25% of gdp, if the government had grown to this size where it is right now and you were trying to figure out how to deal with it and you were in charge, would it be all about -- would the first thing you come up with be raising taxes? would not -- wouldn't you address the spending -- wouldn't you address the spending side of -- >> right. >> -- and, you know, the republicans are trying to criticize the obama proposals by say
that environment look like? >> i don't think that's what happens. we're not talking about taking tax rates from 35 to 50 or 60. we're talking a few percentage points. so it's uncertainty, well do i get my deductions, do i pay a hayer rate? what is my mix and until then i sit on my hands. bringing up the again the uncertainty factor. i think we get to a point where we get some sort of compromise around these things. we'll get back through a muddle through economy. not a great one but good enough one. david: the president's comments of last year notwithstanding where he was for lowering rates. rates go up in one way, shape or form. rather than spending money in the stock market where people get taxed more they think of more direct investment? more vehicles that avoid the stock market entirely and get cash directly to the companies? >> that could happen and would be good for the economy which in a perverse way would be good for the stock market as well if you see my logic. getting people to move off the dime. to say i don't need this hoard of cash frankly earning almost nothing. i need to put it to w
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remember to put money to work. in an environment where not people put money to work and people aren't doing anything, you get an influx of retail money. you have to commit that money to your retirement and to your kids. >> interesting. >> it's a big difference. >> btig has a note on seasonality regarding the end of the year and even december '08 was positive. how resilient the month of december is. >> funny you mention that. that was such a false tell. we thought maybe things had bottomed and then just off a cliff, not fiscal but stock right after that. it's a great note. >> meantime, as we await the opening bell this morning, we'll look at the s&p 500 at the realtime exchange on the top of your screen. big board here. >> there's the bell over at the nasdaq today, sears holdings and st. jude's children's research hospital celebrating the st. jude thanks and giving campaign. lead story involves delta and talks they say to acquire from singapore some stakes in virgin atlanta. >> we'll see what happens. they have been active. the one people are more focused on is american airlines in bankruptc
to look over the long haul, over the long-term, whether you have an environment that's right for business. i think in arizona we are trying to get things right so over the long haul we can build a more diverse sustainable economy. i think we are headed in the right direction. stuart: i'm not being flip here, what kind of tax break dos you offer them -- tax breaks do you offer them, just give me an idea. >> if you bring manufacturing to our state, you are going to get a tax credit. if you bring research and development, you will get a tax credit. if you engage in sustainability, green jobs, you will get a tax credit. look, we saw the landscape around the country, and we wanted to make sure we were as competitive as possible. and a lot of it is not going to be companies moving from california, but as this economy improves, a lot of companies are going to be expanding. and we want them to look to our city, our state as they make those important expansion decisions, particularly again for those jobs. stuart: do you actually go to california yourself and try to prize them loose? >> i have been
in a slow growth environment, but they've kept interest rates very low in japan, but the problem is, government is too big. that's why japan has not been able to start growing again. and this is the path that the u.s. is certainly on if we don't change that dynamic. >> paul: kim, is there any recognition about this in washington or is it all -- i mean, do you hear any of this discussion or do they really believe, certainly, the white house and the treasury, that tax rates like this don't matter, at that ultimately-- >> no, they do to a degree. if you talk to the officials iran up, come on, so we're going to raise the rates, what is fascinating to put it in the bigger context of the debate about tax revenue, the economists have the static view, you've got x-amounts of capital gains income and you get 20% more tax revenue. >> you don't, because people decide to shelter it. they do their transactions the year before, when the amount is less. and so, all of these numbers that the white house is counting on and sort of rubbing its hands together hoping to get. they're not going to get an
at starbucks. people are desperate to find something new to buy. >> and in an environment of rising employment, that's a big deal for mcdonald's especially in the breakfast business which is a high margin business. it is highly leveraged to macro indicators too. >> when i go there, there's a promotion going on that didn't bring me into the store. i want to be brought into a store because of a promotion and not discover, wow, i paid much less than i thought. >> i told you about mcbites. will you go into the store now? >> i think they are called mccorn balls now. we changed the name. >> melissa is up to date on the menu. >> yesterday it was mcrib. >> these are very important to the stories of these fast food chains. that's why i'm so -- >> what's the calorie count? when you see the calorie count that's the determinant. can i have three lipitor. >> that's what i'm on right now. >> are you really? where is your bad cholesterol? >> it's not good. not good. >> mine is 80. >> goody for you. that's what happens when you get old. you compare cholesterol levels. >> i went to trader joe's last night. tur
exceptionally clear, natural sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call 1-800-511-3035 or visit for a risk-free 30 day trial offer and free dvd and brochure. get the hearing aid that can. lyric from phonak. lyric can. >>> police in arizona are desperately searching for this 11-year-old leukemia patient. she disappeared six days ago, just one day shy of being released from the hospital. but here's the thing. doctors fear this catheter in this girl's heart could possibly lead to an infection, could endanger her life. girl, she's identified only as emily, and you see her here walking on the right side of that, with her mother on the left. this is surveillance video, leaving phoenix children's hospital. the woman allegedly removed the girl's iv, changed her clothes, and walked her out the door. as for why, no one seems to know. the 11-year-old already had to have her right arm amputated because of an infection and is in desperate need of me
, to be a welcoming, supportive environment for patients who want to live normal lives. >> to make it, you know, human, to make it tender, to make it hospitable. when people ask me, is it hard? no, it's not hard. it's a privilege to do that. >> it really gets to you, doesn't it? >> yeah. >> you're taking more than we now consider a safe dose. >> many of these patients are here because some physicians and legislators are trying to curb washington state's prescription drug overdose problem. >> i think this is the worst manmade epidemic in history. >> dr. gary franklin is medical director for the state of washington's department of labor and industries. when is the first time this even became an issue that you had noticed? >> by 2001, our claims managers were sending me cases of injured workers who had had a low-back sprain and who were dead three years later from an unintentional overdose of prescribed opioids. it was the saddest thing i'd ever seen. >> so he took action, helping write guidelines that this year became state law. it applies to non-cancer chronic pain patients. it mandates prescriber educ
. >> he designed the center for pain relief, he says, to be a welcoming, supportive environment for patients who want to live normal lives. >> to make it, you know, human, to make it tender, to make it hospitable. when people ask me, is it hard? no, it's not hard. it's a privilege to do that. >> it really gets to you, doesn't it? >> by 2001, our claims managers were sending me cases of injured workers who had had a low-back sprain and who were dead three years later from an unintentional overdose of prescribed opioids. it was the saddest thing i'd ever seen. >> so he took action, helping write guidelines that this year became state law. it applies to non-cancer chronic pain patients. it mandates prescriber education, treatment plans called pain contracts between physicians and patients, and tracking of opioid use. if states don't follow new laws reflecting best practices and universal prautions so opioids can be used safely and effectively, this will never turn around. >> the washington state law does have its share of critics, many of whom are patients dealing with pain right n
and in iraq throughout that whole period. women have performed extremely well in all of those environments. so i think even within our own country, there's plenty of evidence suggesting that women are very capable of handle these jobs. >> you know, the military's official policy towards servicewomen goes back to 1994. that's when this rule was put in place. why do you think it hasn't been looked at? what more needs to be done? >> well, for a number of years, we weren't really actively at war, so people weren't really looking at it. while we were at war, people have been concerned about just fighting the fight and getting the job done. but personally, i am a little surprised that since we have been at war for ten years, people haven't looked more closely at this, haven't looked at the reality of what is going on on the ground in iraq and afghanistan and haven't been making more steps to move this away. so i think we're headed there now. better late than never, i suppose, but we need to see this happen here soon. >> in getting ready for this segment with you, we contacted the department of defen
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minutes but steve, if i could start with you, talk to us about the entrepreneurial environment right now in america. we hear two things. one, we hear that when the economy is not doing all that well, it's the best time ever to try and start something new. and then on the other hand, we hear that a lot of what's going on in america is keeping entrepreneurs from starting those new ventures. >> well, some of that is true. start-ups are down in the last five years. about 23%. but it is worth remembering that we started as a start-up. this company was a start-up in the last couple years, the reason we're the leading economy is because of the entrepreneurs building start-ups that have really powered our economy. we really need to as a nation double down on entrepreneurship. some of that is what needs to happen in washington, the jobs act that passed six months ago, the broad bipartisan support dealt with crowd funding and on-ramp for ipos. start-up app 2.0 introduces with bipartisan support. there's a role for washington but there's also a role for the private sector particularly entrepreneurs
't think it's isolated to the two fund managers. the point is if you're in a low return environment, you can ratchet up performance in a higher quartile, the other thing is it's not just hedge funds. they're the whipping boy. it's long only funds, they want to get that morningstar fifth star. on the other side of it, i used to know a guy when he ran a hedge fund he would sell into the markup and buy it back the next day which is great if you're not a taxable fund because he knew it was a hark wrup so this story is as old as lincoln getting shot at ford theater. i don't think there's anything here, it's very difficult to prove. >> of all of the street's top strategists, tom lee could nail the number on where the s&p will close out 2012. his prediction of 14,030 is looking better by the day. tom welcome, good to see you again. >> thanks. >> how does that factor in? i don't know if you heard geithner on our air yesterday with steve liesman but sounded like a guy prepared to go cliff diving. >> i did hear that and you know, that's not very constructive talk because at the end of the day, you
left, let's talk about the current environment. what are you hearing from a lot of the senior executives that are asking for your advice or if you're in a board room or chatting with them especially in terms of the fiscal cliff and concern about making big decisions or lack thereof and not putting money at it. >> the interesting part is talk about the fiscal cliff is the talk about the talk about the fiscal cliff. i don't think people are as concerned as the level of chatter that goes around. i think the chatter is more than the concern. the fiscal cliff just happens to be a preset deal on a scale of one to ten. it's a deal that is possible as outcome. i think what the country should hope for is that we come up with a better deal. business wants the rules. i understand why business is very much do a deal. do a something. because a business then can make their plans around that. if a marginal tax rate goes up too high here, they'll put a plant somewhere else. you can make those decisions. they want to know the rules. >> know the rules of the road. >> there's an america out ther
are smith travel, if you look at those numbers, it's a very positive environment. the fiscal cliff will affect people when employment gets affected. this is a real issue. if you see something occurring with employment, we're sensitive, we're monitoring, we represent the folks that are going to be most affected if they don't do their job in washington. we're obviously concerned about it. if they deal with it, which we think they will. we think that next year should be pretty positive. >> meanwhile big party tonight? >> big party tonight, big party last night. >> that's what the city's all about. >> we'll be opening white plains in may, it will be a little warmer than it was up there last night. it's very exciting to see those hotels get done. 1,000 jobs for the city. >> you see at the bottom of your screen, nat gas inventory. >> listen natural gas prices are extending their gains from yet, after that 4% rally that we saw. we're looking at resistance perhaps around the 4.75 level. we saw a natural gas level that was certainly not what analysts were expectings. 65 billion cubic feet w
serious like sexual assault, we have to basically get serious about an environment that could lead to sexual harassment. what is going on over there? >> yeah, basically, this is unprecedented. starting today, air force commands and supervisors in every work space, every public space, are going to be going through and inspecting it, scrubbing them for pictures, inappropriate pictures, scantily clad women on calendars, photos, even briefing slides that were shown in some training. they're going to be going through and trying to get rid of all of that. in fact, the air farce chief of staff said, quote, quite frankly if we ve 20% of our people who don't feel that they are fully respected and valued, then that's just not the air force we want to be. basically saying that a lot of women felt that they had to go along to get along, that there were jokes being told, photos out there that made them extremely uncomfortable, and they just could not get anyone to listen. >> and, chris, you know, you would think with all the awareness that the number of sexual assaults would be going down, but
environment again and really if you look at the economy, we're probably going back to the '90 style economy where you had 3%, 3.5% was really good growth. 2% growth which we're experiencing right now is pretty good. full employment might be 5.5, 6% like the old days. and i think with that being said, we've got to to get a little bit closer to those numbers to really have the economy start to take off. and i don't think we're that far in there. >> any much those numbers we would take. i don't know whether we are or not. wishful thinking for cantor. certainly would help you guys. why didn't you like fighting irish? >> they were on tv every week when i was a child and i'd like to see alabama win. >> alabama won last year. >> that's okay. all right. thank you. see you later. >>> in fact in some of the squawk sports news this morning, dallas beating philadelphia in sunday night nfl game. 38-33. tony romo threw three touchdown passes to break troy aikman's career franchise record. and the jets beat the cardinals 7-6. new york scoring the lone touchdown after mark sanchez was benched with tim tebo
to listen yet, so we've just got to wait. that's obviously not a great environment to move things along. the optimists on both sides think we're going to get a deal, not by christmas, but by new year's. if you ask people, what's the next step? what gets things moving? it's still complicated, and nobody has a consensus on that. the biggest challenge is how you strike a deal this year that has some things left undone for next year. and there's all sorts of people thinking about different kinds of triggers, different kind of things that say, well, if congress doesn't do x, then y kicks in, but there's no agreement on what those need to be. there's going to be more revenue, but things like entitlement reform, tax reform, those things are still very unsettled. >> so senator tom coburn yesterday on "morning joe" became the latest to break rank, saying he could support president obama's tax proposal. coburn joins a growing chorus of republicans from outside the house of representatives, urging house leadership to clear the way for a broad deal that would include tax increases on the wealthy. h
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in this current, you know, environment to get close to where you guys were talking about without raising rates? >> it does not have to happen. i think it is the easiest way to guarantee that you'll get some additional reveeue. that does not mean once you drive the rates back up -- we are actually able to bring the top rates down to the high 20s. i think that is probably more aggressive than where we will go. it all depends on where you start your baseline. one of the things that is also important is. the more revenue we get, it also means more entitlement cuts and spending which means the bigger the deal, the better it is. connell: give me an odds, you are pretty optimistic? >> i think it is an 80% chance we avoid the cliff. but, do we avoid the cliff with a real deal or not? connell: senator warner, thanks a lot. dagen: i know the senator was that did what i have to say, go redskins. he has been terrific. one good thing to come out of d.c. calico weapons may be the last straw. we talked to you about the latest in syria. connell: 401(k) matches on employees. could that spread to other companie
to part time, in the environment where we're looking at 8% unemployment, this isn't about solving the economy. it's very obvious now. stuart: all politics all the time, it is redistribution, it's neo-socialism, forget what it will actually do to economic growth, no, what will it do for my political legacy? >> that's the point. it's advancing the causes of bureaucracy and dependency. so you have people who they no long very a full-time job. they have a part-time job. they need more government benefits you need a bigger bureaucracy to administer it. i'm not a big government fan. if you catch say the euro train on the continent two hours from brussels, that's pretty good, if you want government spending, here's something to show for it. there's nothing to show for it here except the department of bureaucratic compliance. charles: this was a big beef with the stimulus package. they are like -- they built a bridge that took me to stuart and it took them two years to do it. charles: hold on a second. i have to go to nicole, a bank announced they are cutting 11,000 positions? they are re
americans who saved it do not have enough for environment. lori: should average investors follow the institutions? >> yeah, you know, one of the things we are seeing is a lot of institutions have held off or have looked at managing risk and mitigating in their own portfolios. you are looking at this longer-term investing. writing to the store. looking at structures that allow you to mitigate risk and have better sleeping at night. you cannot fund a retirement by earning a half of a percent of 1% and a stable money market fund or bond. you will need to take some risk. sure. i was just going to come in with a risk. should i go risk on all the way and really go crazy and put in some, you know -- [talking over each other] >> it all depends on what your circumstances are. if you have some longer-term horizons, you should be looking out what type of risk you can look at in the portfolio. the big dynamic change has been risks moving from i do not want to miss the upside to a game i want to watch and protect my principal. it is about risk budgeting now more than the way i need to allocat
because it's such a masculine environment, you try to mask everything. if you hurt your ankle, you fake it and run it off like nothing's wrong. especially if you have an emotional or mental problem. you're certainly going to mask it. along the way if you don't you're going to get weeded out. football is a game of attrition. the weak don't make it to the top levels. so you mask any issues or demons that you may have so that you can get to that top level. i think it's a disservice, quite honestly, to the individuals in the games. because statistics will tell you that there are a couple guys in the nfl that have mental issues and it doesn't get addressed often enough. >> back to joe linta for a second. we know jovan went to the field and the facility and he talked to his coaches. i mean, he was talking to them with a gun to his head. why do you think his instinct after he kills his girlfriend, the baby in the other room, would be to go and thank his coaches? >> i think the instinct would have been the kind of young man that he was and the way he was raised that, you know, he probably -- i
around you and we all are products of our environment. the amount of contact we were taking, the amount of fire fights, rpgs, rockets, whatever it may be. that tour for us was a 15-month tour, which was it shall that's pretty long for some young people. we are there to help them out, find ways of doing the same thing they've been doing. when i wrote the book i want ed to describe the valley and the people around me. so often i'm congratulated or patted on the back and thanked and i've never done anything in the military alone. i was able to put my buddies' names in print and highlight the actionses they've done. there are so many things that we don't hear about. >> our good friend sebastien younger who talked about stalked about your heroism, your unit, and the terrible conditions. i remember reading about it. it seemed remarkable what you did. what you did and how you describe it like so many other recipients that said in the past, i did my job. it was reflex. i was trained well and i was going to save my buddies. talk about that night. and also the reluctance to be called a hero. i've
and that's what you get in living in newark, new jersey, in an urban environment where the food is not particularly cheap is tough. you're right, they're not paying for every meal and calorie he's ingesting but that's not much food. >> what's part of that discussion a twitter conversation where somebody said the state shouldn't be responsible for nutrition, right? and because part of the problem here is that people who are food stamps don't have access to really healthy food. you see cory booker made his, you know, best attempt at getting healthy food, frozen vegetables, canned beans and things like that. that is part of the problem with nutrition and poverty stricken areas. >> and that amount. we have to take a short break. >> [ inaudible ]. >> still ahead -- >> have a job, son. >> you do. i'm going to check you. >> "the new york post" and its photographer taking heat over the cover photo of a man taking minutes before his death he was crushed by the train. did the paper cross the line in publishing that picture. we'll talk about that coming up. lashawn's got her christmas list
. >> what happens to the money? >> what always happens to money. we have an environment where the interest rates are low, so if you reinvest it in a fixed income product, you won't make much return. you'll have capital losses on bonds. i'm very concerned about the low interest rate in the bond market and the long period of time we've had bond yield this is low. and in the stock market, you have to be careful because there could be a sorting out among stocks between high and low dividend stocks and how they perform when these guys go x dividend. >> why couldn't you invest in g chlt and g e or comcast and get a 3% yield there. either one would be a good place.or comcast and get a 3% y there. either one would be a good place. >> wasn't i invested in company x before, didn't i have that money in there and now they're giving it back? >> now you own a larger part of the company. >> no, because -- >> if you reinvest it and they buy more share, you own a larger piece of it. >> it should be equal. they've taken that cash out of the company. the stock price should adjust lower. >> but cash is not th
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)